Lenin Statue
Lenin Statue

How this rare statue came to Fremont

This cast bronze sculpture of Vladimir Lenin was created by Emil Venkov. Weighing over 7 tons and 16 feet tall, the sculpture took ten years to complete and is truly unique. It is believed to be the only representation portraying Lenin surrounded by guns and flames instead of holding a book or waving his hat. The sculptor was able to express his vision of Lenin as a violent revolutionary.

An American veteran teaching in Poprad, Lewis Carpenter, found the sculpture lying face down after it was toppled in the 1989 Revolution. He recognized Venkov’s skill and craftsmanship and the boldness of his portrayal. It was brought to Fremont in 1996 and sits in the heart of downtown Fremont at the intersection of Fremont Place North, North 36th Street and Evanston Avenue North.

Like the Fremont Troll and the Waiting for the Interurban sculpture, the Lenin statue is often decorated, appropriated, or vandalized with various intentions, both whimsical and serious.

Lenin in Fremont: Right or Wrong?

The presence of this sculpture has evoked a wide range of responses. If art is supposed to make us feel, not just feel good, then this sculpture is a successful work of art. The challenge is to understand that this piece means different things to different people and to learn to listen to each other and respect different opinions. From an artists standpoint, all points of view are valid and important.

Art Outlives Politics

This sculpture is placed here in the Artist’s Republic of Fremont, as a symbol of an artistic spirit that outlasts regimes and ideologies, and as tangible proof that art does outlive politics.

The Fremont Chamber of Commerce supports art as expressive freedom and a means of preserving and remembering history. We have no connection to the statue or any way of contacting the owners. It is on private land and privately owned.

Learn more: